Jerry Saltz Net Worth: A Millionaire Art Critic

Jerry Saltz, a celebrated American art critic, has earned the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism and reshaped the art landscape with his perceptive and thought-provoking writings. This article delves into his net worth, lifestyle, achievements, challenges, background, and conclusion.

Net Worth

Jerry Saltz’s net worth is estimated to be approximately $4 million, sourced from his role as a senior art critic and columnist at New York magazine. Additionally, his income stems from speaking engagements, book deals, and curatorial projects. While the exact amount remains undisclosed, it may fluctuate based on his lifestyle choices and expenditures.

How did Jerry Saltz become an art critic?

Jerry Saltz started his career as an artist, and attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago from 1970 to 1975 before dropping out. He moved to New York City in 1980, and began writing art reviews for various publications in the 1990s.

He gained recognition for his distinctive voice and perspective, and became a regular contributor to The Village Voice and New York magazine. He also taught art criticism at several universities and institutions, and served as the sole advisor for the 1995 Whitney Biennial. He received three nominations and one win for the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism, as well as three honorary doctorates from different art schools

Lifestyle

Residing in New York City alongside his wife, Roberta Smith, also an art critic for The New York Times, Saltz calls a modest Chelsea apartment home, adorned with books, art, and feline companions. Renowned for his active presence on social media platforms like Twitter and Instagram, he shares his opinions, reviews, and snapshots of his life. Engaging with followers by answering queries, providing guidance, and hosting challenges, Saltz finds joy in exploring art galleries, museums, and diverse cultures through travel.

Achievements

Jerry Saltz boasts numerous accolades for his contributions as an art critic. Nominated thrice for the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism, he clinched the award in 2018 for his insightful reviews that vividly capture the essence of artistry. Honorary doctorates from esteemed institutions such as the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Kansas City Art Institute, and the Pratt Institute further highlight his influence. With authored works like “Seeing Out Loud: The Village Voice Art Columns, 1998-2003” and “How to Be an Artist,” Saltz’s impact extends beyond criticism. Notably, he served as a judge on the Bravo series “Work of Art: The Next Great Artist” and curated various exhibitions.

Challenges

Jerry Saltz navigated numerous challenges throughout his life and career. Grieving the loss of his mother at ten, he battled depression and anxiety. Despite initially pursuing art at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Saltz departed and worked as a long-distance truck driver until his early forties. Overcoming rejection and critique from the art world, he grappled with insecurities while adapting to evolving art trends and societal expectations as a public figure.

Background

Born on February 19, 1951, in Chicago, Illinois, Jerry Saltz developed a passion for art during his upbringing in Oak Park and River Forest. Attending the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, he initially studied painting and sculpture before transitioning to writing about art upon moving to New York City in 1980. Commencing his career as an artist, Saltz shifted his focus to art criticism, contributing to publications like Art in America and The Village Voice. Since joining New York magazine in 2006, he continues to shape the art discourse.

Conclusion

Jerry Saltz emerges as a pivotal figure in the art world, leaving an indelible mark through his candid critiques, accessible style, and unwavering passion for art. Overcoming personal and professional obstacles, he inspires aspiring artists and critics alike with his resilience and wisdom. Saltz epitomizes the essence of being an artist in its broadest interpretation

Leave a Comment