News Update: Washington, DC: Americans await $600 COVID-19 pandemic relief stimulus checks as United States Senate again unable to increase stimulus check payment to $2,000.

By: Zachary Lopez (ZachNews):

Sources: United States Senate (Information):

Washington, District of Columbia: Americans await their $600 COVID-19 pandemic relief stimulus checks as the United States Senate was unable to vote on Wednesday, December 30th, 2020 to increase the stimulus check payment to $2,000.

Tuesday afternoon, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin announced that the $600 checks would begin to go out Wednesday.

Posting on Twitter, Steven Mnuchin, “.@USTreasury has delivered a payment file to the @FederalReserve for Americans’ Economic Impact Payments. These payments may begin to arrive in some accounts by direct deposit as early as tonight and will continue into next week. Paper checks will begin to be mailed tomorrow. Later this week, you can check the status of your payment at http://IRS.gov/GetMyPayment.”

In a press release also Tuesday afternoon, the Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service will begin delivering a second round of Economic Impact Payments to millions of Americans as part of the implementation of the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021. The initial direct deposit payments may begin arriving as early as tonight for some and will continue into next week. Paper checks will begin to be mailed tomorrow, Wednesday, December 30. This second round of payments will provide critical economic support to those who, through no fault of their own, have been adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Treasury and the IRS are working with unprecedented speed to issue a second round of Economic Impact Payments to eligible Americans and their families. These payments are an integral part of our commitment to providing vital additional economic relief to the American people during this unprecedented time,” said Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin.

Eligible individuals will receive an Economic Impact Payment of up to $600 for individuals or $1200 for married couples and up to $600 for each qualifying child. Generally, if you have adjusted gross income for 2019 up to $75,000 for individuals and up to $150,000 for married couples filing joint returns and surviving spouses, you will receive the full amount of the second payment. For filers with income above those amounts, the payment amount is reduced.

This second round of payments will be distributed automatically, with no action required for eligible individuals. If additional legislation is enacted to provide for an increased amount, Economic Impact Payments that have been issued will be topped up as quickly as possible.

The swift issuance of this second round of payments follows the successful delivery of more than $270 billion in CARES Act Economic Impact Payments earlier this year, providing crucial economic support to nearly 160 million Americans.

Later this week, you may check the status of your payment at: https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus/get-my-payment.

For more information about Economic Impact Payments, please visit: https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus/economic-impact-payments.

Meanwhile, for a second day in a row, United States Senator Chuck Schumer tried to force a vote on the bill approved by the House meeting United States President Donald Trump’s demand for the $2,000 checks.

What we’re seeing right now is Leader McConnell trying to kill the checks — the $2,000 checks desperately needed by so many American families,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.

United States Senator Chuck Schumer again tried to unanimously pass the House standalone bill that swaps out the $600 payments for $2,000, but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell objected the unanimously pass the United States House of Representatives standalone bill, and went after Democrats in the United States Senate for wanting to send a “boatload of cash” to people making six figures who aren’t in need but will likely receive some cash due to the way the payments are structured based on income.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said it doesn’t make sense to support Americans who haven’t lost income due to the pandemic, basing his argument solely on economics.

“The Senate’s not going to be bullied into rushing out more borrowed money into the hands of Democrats’ rich friends who don’t need the help,” said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell added that the United States Congress needs to send “smart targeted aid. Not another firehose of money.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell also said he will not split the $2,000 relief payment bill from a repeal of Section 230 or the election fraud commission.

“Speaker Pelosi and Leader Schumer are trying to pull a fast one on the president and the American people. They’re hoping everyone just forgets about election integrity and (Sec. 230). They’re desperate to ignore those two parts of President Trump’s request,” said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

“The Senate is not going to split apart the three issues that President Trump linked together,” said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Senator Bernie Sanders also tried to pass the House bill unanimously, but Senator Pat Toomey objected.

In a statement on Wednesday, Senator Pat Toomey said, “Blindly borrowing or printing another two-thirds of a trillion dollars so we can send $2,000 to children, the deceased, and tens of millions of workers who haven’t missed a paycheck, like federal and state employees, is not sound economic policy nor is it something I am willing to support.”

The showdown over the $2,000 checks has thrown United States Congress into a chaotic year-end session just days before new lawmakers are set to be sworn into office for the new year.

With the Georgia Senate runoff elections days away, leading Republicans warned that the GOP’s refusal to provide more aid as the virus worsens could jeopardize the outcome of those races.

We will all have to wait for what 2021 will bring for the people of the United States.

***

%d bloggers like this: