News Alert!!: Sacramento, CA: California Energy Commission has approved a requirement for solar panels on new homes starting in 2020.

News Alert!!: Sacramento, CA: California Energy Commission has approved a requirement for solar panels on new homes starting in 2020.

The California Energy Commission has approved on Wednesday, May 9th, 2018 a requirement for solar panels on new homes starting in 2020.

The commission’s vote, which reportedly occurred in Sacramento, California, is a critical step toward possible final approval expected in late 2018 by the California’s Building Standards Commission, and would be the first state with such a requirement.

The California Energy Commission estimates they would add an average $10,500 in construction costs for a single-family home but generate about $16,000 in energy savings.

The changes also includes requirements around ventilation and indoor air quality.

California has positioned itself as the nationwide leader on clean energy, pushing for more electric vehicles on the roads and fewer emissions from residential and commercial buildings.

In a statement regarding the vote, Solar Energy Industries Association C.E.O. Abigail Ross Hopper said, “Following is a statement from Abigail Ross Hopper, SEIA’s president and CEO: “This is an undeniably historic decision for the state and the U.S. California has long been our nation’s biggest solar champion, and its mass adoption of solar has generated huge economic and environmental benefits, including bringing tens of billions of dollars of investment into the state. Now, California is taking bold leadership again, recognizing that solar should be as commonplace as the front door that welcomes you home. SEIA appreciates the Commission’s efforts to help California take steps toward meeting its Zero Net Energy goals by integrating renewable energy with energy efficiency. The combination of rooftop solar and the option to add energy storage systems as an efficiency compliance credit provides builders with an attractive, cost-effective option to fully electrify homes. Other states may not be ready for this step yet, but this is a precedent-setting policy — one that will bring enormous benefits and cost savings to consumers. It is my hope and belief that when other states, many of which are developing rapidly growing solar markets of their own, see the benefits of this policy, they will develop similarly aggressive policies.

A few industry groups outwardly oppose the plan after working for years with the commission to shape the regulations.

Republican legislative leaders said Californians can’t afford to pay any more for housing in California’s already extremely expensive market.

The California Building Industry Association supports the solar panel requirement after years of working with the energy commission to refine the requirement.

The commission estimates that about 117,000 new single-family homes and 48,000 multi-family units will be built in 2020.

California is already the nation’s leader for solar capacity, and several cities in California have already been mandating some solar power in new buildings.

More information is still coming into ZachNews.

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