Colorado River Tri-State: Getting ready for Solar Eclipse 2017.

Colorado River Tri-State: Getting ready for Solar Eclipse 2017.

Get ready everybody as a solar eclipse will be happening on  Monday, August 21st, 2017 over the United States of America.

As seen on the map above from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (N.A.S.A.), depending on where you are in the United States of America, you will enjoy a full solar eclipse well other states may enjoy some part of the solar eclipse, all depending on the weather conditions in your area.

Depending on the weather conditions, people in the Colorado River Tri-State area, including Needles, California; Topock, Arizona; Mohave Valley, Arizona; Laughlin, Nevada; and Kingman, Arizona, will enjoy 70% of the solar eclipse.

** Needles, California: **

 

The solar eclipse will start at around 9:10am PT.

The maximum solar eclipse will be at around 10:28am PT.

The end of the solar eclipse will be at around 11:54am PT.

According to the National Weather Service, scattered showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny and hot, with a high near 107. Calm wind becoming south 5 to 8 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 40%.

** More Weather Information: **

http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?lon=-114.60701260691674&lat=34.84005564091872#.WZqEQz5961t

**** Important Notice: Needles Unified School District: ****

According to the Needles Unified School District, a “Modified Shelter in Place Drill” will be in place from 10:00am to 11:00am PT for the Total Solar Eclipse on Monday, August 21st, 2017.

“The eclipse can be a terrific teaching tool, however there can be safety issues to consider! Needles USD will take precautions to ensure that all students are safe as they can learn about this scientific phenomenon,” said the Needles Unified School District on their website.

** More Information: Needles Unified School District: **

https://1.cdn.edl.io/7JYQmpKb8U2vynAvLxrxPjm3E0SYaZF2tqTpJQfbJjFvjG1T.pdf

 

** Topock, Arizona: **

The solar eclipse will start at around 9:10am MST.

The maximum solar eclipse will be at around 10:28am MST.

The end of the solar eclipse will be at around 11:54am MST.

According to the National Weather Service, scattered showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny and hot, with a high near 107. Calm wind becoming south 5 to 9 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 40%.

** More Weather Information: **

http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?lon=-114.48086141088787&lat=34.777224823480324#.WZqDjD5961t

 

** Mohave Valley, Arizona: **

The solar eclipse will start at around 9:10am MST.

The maximum solar eclipse will be at around 10:28am MST.

The end of the solar eclipse will be at around 11:54am MST.

According to the National Weather Service, scattered showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny and hot, with a high near 107. Calm wind becoming south southwest 5 to 9 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 40%.

** More Weather Information: **

http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?lon=-114.59862507141521&lat=34.86558500749109#.WZqDjz5961t

 

** Laughlin, Nevada: **

The solar eclipse will start at around 9:09am PT.

The maximum solar eclipse will be at around 10:28am PT.

The end of the solar eclipse will be at around 11:54am PT.

According to the National Weather Service, scattered showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 104. Calm wind becoming south southwest 5 to 8 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 40%.

** More Weather Information: **

http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?lon=-114.57499812442536&lat=35.16131601224568#.WZqDkz5961t

 

** Kingman, Arizona: **

The solar eclipse will start at around 9:10am PT.

The maximum solar eclipse will be at around 10:29am PT.

The end of the solar eclipse will be at around 11:58am PT.

According to the National Weather Service, showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly after 11am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 94. Calm wind becoming southwest 5 to 8 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

** More Weather Information: **

http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?lon=-114.06314130067207&lat=35.189428548489204#.WZqDpD5961s

**** Solar Eclipse 2017 Events: ****

  • Kingman Branch Library, located at 3269 North Burbank Street in Kingman, Arizona, will be having a Solar Eclipse 2017 event to witness this natural event. Free eclipse glasses will be available for the viewing. The event will be in front of the library at 10:00am MST. The event is free and open to the public.
  • Lake Mead National Recreation Area is holding a free viewing party at the visitor center from 9:00am to 12:00pm MST. Park rangers will be giving a presentation and be available to answer questions throughout the event. There will be solar glasses available for purchase for those who wish to experience the event on their own. There will also be a solar telescope for people to look through at the ranger station.

 

**** What Is U.T. (Universal Time) Means: ****

 

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (N.A.S.A.) will also be showing the solar eclipse online for anybody who is unable to enjoy the Solar Eclipse 2017 outside in their area.

**** Solar Eclipse 2017 Live: ****

Just in case the weather is good enough to enjoy the solar eclipse, here is some information from N.A.S.A. you needs to know about the solar eclipse as well as how to see the solar eclipse safely.

  • What is a solar eclipse?

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the Earth and the sun, obscuring part or all of the star from the planet. During a partial eclipse, the sun basically looks like a bite has been taken out of it, but at the time of totality – when the moon passes fully in front of the sun – it’s fully obscured. For the Aug. 21 eclipse, the longest period when the moon obscures the sun’s entire surface along its path will last about 2 minutes and 40 seconds.

  • Why are they so rare?

A total solar eclipse hasn’t been visible from the contiguous U.S. since 1979, and total solar eclipses usually only grace the skies above a given location every 100 years or so, according to NASA estimates. However, solar eclipses in general happen pretty often. On average, solar eclipses of one kind or another happen about two to four times per year somewhere across the planet.

  • Where can I see it?

The path of totality begins in Lincoln Beach, Oregon. From there, the deep shadow of the moon will pass over parts of Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina before ending at 4:09 p.m. ET. Most cities along the path have planned festivals and viewing events to watch the eclipse. If you’re not able to get to one of the locations, you can always catch the eclipse live online.

  • Can I stare at the sun during the eclipse?

No. Dangerous UV light will cause severe retinal damage or blindness. Looking directly at the sun is unsafe except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse or totality, when the moon entirely blocks the sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality.

The only safe way to look directly at the un-eclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewers.

** More Information: Eyewear Safety: **

https://1.cdn.edl.io/CfZfazy1UEc9xLJbU6gGmeJoddQ6qOoN2VULzZP84YehAntV.pdf

Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the sun. To date four manufacturers have certified that their eclipse glasses and handheld solar viewers meet the ISO 12312-2 international standard for such products: Rainbow Symphony, American Paper Optics, Thousand Oaks Optical and TSE 17.

Always inspect your solar filter before use; if scratched or damaged, discard it. Read and follow any instructions printed on or packaged with the filter.

Always supervise children using solar filters. Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright sun.

After glancing at the sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the sun. Do not look at the un-eclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device.

Do not look at the sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eyes, causing serious injury.

Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device.

If you are within the path of totality, remove your solar filter only when the Moon completely covers the sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark.

Experience totality, then, as soon as the bright sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to glance at the remaining partial phases.

**** Have fun and enjoy safely the Solar Eclipse 2017 everybody. ****

** Picture Above from NBC affiliate KNBC Channel 4: **

%d bloggers like this: