News Update!!: Needles, CA: Spraying down the mosquitoes.

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News Update!!: Needles, CA: Spraying down the mosquitoes.

As well all have been hoping for, the mosquitoes were sprayed down on Wednesday, October 21st, 2015 around Needles, California after people in this community got sick and tired of being attacked by these mosquitoes.

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Before the spraying for mosquitoes begun, notices of the spraying were placed in the locations where the spraying will be happening, including at Ed Parry Park, River Edge Golf Course, and Jack Smith Memorial Park in Needles, California

Vector Control from the San Bernardino County’s Department of Public Health, Division of Environmental Health Services, began their spraying or “fogging” of areas around schools, parks, baseball fields, golf courses, and other locations where there have seen swarm of mosquitoes.

The spraying for mosquitoes took place in the morning around the schools in Needles, California.

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Later, the spraying for mosquitoes moved to the area of Ed Parry Park, River Edge Golf Course, Jack Smith Memorial Park, and Needles Marina R.V. Park in Needles, California where some mosquito were earlier flying around and even bite ZachNews Photojournalist Zachary A. Lopez near some standing water well taking pictures and videos of the spraying for mosquitoes.

** Video from ZachNews on YouTube: **

Needles, CA: 10-21-2015: Before Spraying for Mosquitoes.

More mosquitoes were seen along the muddy beach area of the Colorado River near the River Edge Golf Course and Needles Marina R.V. Park as well as later along the entry way into Jack Smith Memorial Park in Needles, California.

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ZachNews Photojournalist Zachary A. Lopez was there to capture the spraying as it was happening near the baseball field at Ed Parry Park, around River Edge Golf Course, and along the channel area and vegetation area along the entry away into Jack Smith Memorial Park in Needles, California.

** Videos from ZachNews on YouTube: **

– Needles, CA: 10-21-2015: Spraying for Mosquitoes. (Ed Parry Park):

– Needles, CA: 10-21-2015: Spraying for Mosquitoes: Part 2. (Jack Smith Memorial Park):

– Needles, CA: 10-21-2015: Spraying for Mosquitoes: Part 3. (Jack Smith Memorial Park):

ZachNews asked Supervising Environmental Health Specialist Jennifer Osorio, R.E.H.S. of San Bernadino County’s Department of Public Health, Division of Environmental Health Services, Mosquito and Vector Control Program about some of the question the community would like to know about.

** Here are their responses to ZachNews questions: **

**** (More questions are being asked and answers are coming soon): ****

1: What chemical is being used in Needles, California and are they harmful to people and can the chemical be sprayed into the Colorado River?

“The chemical that was used in the City of Needles on10/21/15 is Pyrenone 25-5. We advise people to stay indoors and avoid direct contact with the spray. We follow all Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines when using this chemical, including guidelines about spraying around bodies of water. Please visit their website for more information http://www2.epa.gov/pesticides” said Jennifer Osorio, R.E.H.S.

 

2: Do you spray the Bureau of Land Management and Tribal Lands?

We spray in areas where we are given permission.” said Jennifer Osorio, R.E.H.S.

 

3: What kind of mosquitoes is Vector Control finding and are they because of the storm or fires?

The species of mosquito that has been found in Needles is Aedes vexans (Flood Water Mosquitoes) and Aedes nigromaculis (Irrigated Pasture Mosquitoes). These species typically breeding in irrigated pastures and areas that are prone to flooding. Both of these mosquito species commonly arise from seasonal rains.” said Jennifer Osorio, R.E.H.S.

 

4:What should people do to protect themselves and their families?

A. Drain or Dump – Remove all standing water around your property where mosquitos lay eggs such as birdbaths, old tires, pet watering dishes, buckets, or even clogged gutters.

B. Clean and scrub any container with stored water to remove possible eggs.

C. Dress – Wear shoes, socks, long pants and long-sleeved shirts whenever you are outdoors to avoid mosquito bites.

d. DEET – Apply insect repellent containing DEET, PICARDIN, IR3535, or oil of lemon eucalyptus according to manufacturer’s directions.

e. Doors – Make sure doors and windows have tight-fitting screens. Repair or replace screens that have tears or holes to prevent mosquitos from entering your home.” said Jennifer Osorio, R.E.H.S.

 

5: When will we spray again?

We will spray as needed to reduce the adult mosquito population and will assess the area after today’s treatment.” said Jennifer Osorio, R.E.H.S.

 

6: Who is the San Bernardino County Mosquito and Vector Control Program working with and how long will we be in town?

We have been in contact with the City Manager’s Office during this process. Technicians will be out in Needles today 10/21/15 and are in the area weekly treating mosquito breeding sites and conducting surveillance activities.” said Jennifer Osorio, R.E.H.S.

 

7: How often do we trap and test for mosquitoes? Does this last all year? Is there WNV in the area?

We trap mosquitoes on a weekly basis throughout the warmer months of the year. We have various indicators that we use to test for WNV on a biweekly schedule. To date, we have not received any positive WNV indicators in the City of Needles.” said Jennifer Osorio, R.E.H.S.

 

8: Who is paying for the spraying?

All funding for the spraying comes from a Benefit Assessment.” said Jennifer Osorio, R.E.H.S.

We all hope that the spraying helped to fight off the mosquitoes and soon we can enjoy the Colorado River and being outside again.

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